Chart of the Nuclides

These charts are simplified in that many nuclides have multiple decay modes. In most cases these have been omitted as well as other data such as energies, nuclear states, etc. The purpose is for illustrative purposes for introductory physics and astronomy courses. For detailed and current data consult a published Chart of the Nuclides, research publications, or review articles and publications.

Z =   0 to 11chart
Z = 11 to 19chart
Z = 19 to 27chart
Z = 27 to 34chart
Z = 34 to 42chart
Z = 42 to 49chart
Z = 49 to 57chart
 
Z = 57 to 65chart
Z = 65 to 72chart
Z = 72 to 79chart
Z = 79 to 85chart
Z = 85 to 92chart
Z = 92 to 96chart


The charts essentially plot stable and unstable nuclides in terms of the numbers of protons and neutrons.
Each row of the charts contain the same number of protons (Z) and hence represent a single element.
Each column contains the same number of neutrons (N).

Stable nuclides are indicated with a grey background:

 

The percentage abundance for naturally occurring nuclides is given. All stable nuclides occur naturally, but not all naturally occuring nuclides are stable. Those that are unstable generally have a very large characteristic half-life.

Unstable nuclides are color coded according to the decay mode and a prominent decay mode is given with a characteristic half-life.

  Decay Modes
 
 
beta decay
 
result
 β
 
positron decay
 
β+
result
 
electron capture
 
e
capture
result
   
 
proton emission
 
p
result
 
neutron emission
 
resultn
 
alpha decay
 
α (4He)
result
 
triton decay
 
t (3H)
result


It is apparent that a nucleus with an even number of protons and/or an even number of neutrons are more stable. Classifying the 264 stable nuclides results in:

ZNNumber
Stable Nuclides
eveneven157
evenodd53
oddeven50
oddodd4

Periodic Table